Taking a Loan from Your Retirement Plan = Bad Idea

Why you should refrain from making this move.

Thinking about borrowing money from your 401(k), 403(b), or 457 account? Think twice about that because these loans are not only risky, but injurious, to your retirement planning.

   

A loan of this kind damages your retirement savings prospects. A 401(k), 403(b), or 457 should never be viewed like a savings or checking account. When you withdraw from a bank account, you pull out cash. When you take a loan from your workplace retirement plan, you sell shares of your investments to generate cash. You buy back investment shares as you repay the loan.1

In borrowing from a 401(k), 403(b), or 457, you siphon down invested retirement assets, leaving a smaller account balance that experiences a smaller degree of compounding. In repaying the loan, you will likely repurchase investment shares at higher prices than in the past – in other words, you will be buying high. None of this makes financial sense.1

Most plan providers charge an origination fee for a loan (it can be in the neighborhood of $100), and of course, they charge interest. While you will repay interest and the principal as you repay the loan, that interest still represents money that could have remained in the account and remained invested.1,2

As you strive to repay the loan amount, there may be a financial side effect. You may end up reducing or suspending your regular per-paycheck contributions to the plan. Some plans may even bar you from making plan contributions for several months after the loan is taken.3,4

 

Your take-home pay may be docked. Most loans from 401(k), 403(b), and 457 plans are repaid incrementally – the plan subtracts X dollars from your paycheck, month after month, until the amount borrowed is fully restored.1

 

If you leave your job, you will have to pay 100% of your 401(k) loan back. This applies if you quit; it applies if you are laid off or fired. Formerly, you had a maximum of 60 days to repay a workplace retirement plan loan. The Tax Cuts & Jobs Act of 2017 changed that for loans originated in 2018 and years forward. You now have until October of the year following the year you leave your job to repay the loan (the deadline is the due date of your federal taxes plus a 6-month extension, which usually means October 15). You also have a choice: you can either restore the funds to your workplace retirement plan or transfer them to either an IRA or a workplace retirement plan elsewhere.2

If you are younger than age 59½ and fail to pay the full amount of the loan back, the I.R.S. will characterize any amount not repaid as a premature distribution from a retirement plan – taxable income that is also subject to an early withdrawal penalty.3

Even if you have great job security, the loan will probably have to be repaid in full within five years. Most workplace retirement plans set such terms. If the terms are not met, then the unpaid balance becomes a taxable distribution with possible penalties (assuming you are younger than 59½.1

 

Would you like to be taxed twice? When you borrow from an employee retirement plan, you invite that prospect. You will be repaying your loan with after-tax dollars, and those dollars will be taxed again when you make a qualified withdrawal of them in the future (unless your plan offers you a Roth option).3,4

 

Why go into debt to pay off debt? If you borrow from your retirement plan, you will be assuming one debt to pay off another. It is better to go to a reputable lender for a personal loan; borrowing cash has fewer potential drawbacks.  

 

You should never confuse your retirement plan with a bank account. Some employees seem to do just that. Fidelity Investments says that 20.8% of its 401(k) plan participants have outstanding loans in 2018. In taking their loans, they are opening the door to the possibility of having less money saved when they retire.4

Why risk that? Look elsewhere for money in a crisis. Borrow from your employer-sponsored retirement plan only as a last resort.

 

Gregg A Hancock Jr.

Vice President SENB Wealth Management

Trust Business Development Officer

SENB Wealth Management

309-517-5122

wealthmanagement@senb.com

www.senb.com

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Please Note: Investment products provided by SENB Wealth Management are not FDIC insured, are not obligations of, deposits of, or guaranteed by any financial institution, involve Investment risk, Including the possible loss of principal amount invested, are not insured by any federal government agency.

Citations.

1 – gobankingrates.com/retirement/401k/borrowing-401k/ [10/7/17]

2 – forbes.com/sites/ashleaebeling/2018/01/16/new-tax-law-liberalizes-401k-loan-repayment-rules/ [1/16/18]

3 – cbsnews.com/news/when-is-it-ok-to-withdraw-or-borrow-from-your-retirement-savings/ [1/31/17]

4 – cnbc.com/2018/06/26/the-lure-of-a-401k-loan-could-mask-its-risks.html [6/26/18]

 

Weekly Economic Update 10-8-18

In this week’s recap: stocks slump as the 10-year Treasury yield spikes, an ISM index hits a historic peak, job creation weakens, and oil extends its winning streak.

10-YEAR TREASURY YIELD HITS A 7-YEAR PEAK

Friday, the yield on the 10-year note reached 3.23%, its highest level since 2011. Its yield rose dramatically last week, influenced by hawkish comments from Federal Reserve chair Jerome Powell and reports showing minimal unemployment and a swiftly expanding business sector. All this strengthened investor perception that the U.S. economy has hit its stride. It also suggested a near future with recurring interest rate hikes, costlier borrowing, and subdued spending. That possibility weighed on equities. For the week, the Nasdaq Composite fell 3.21% to 7,788.45, and the S&P 500, 0.97% to 2,885.57; the Dow Industrials retreated just 0.04% to 26,447.05.1,2

 

LESS HIRING IN SEPTEMBER

A look at the Department of Labor’s latest jobs report reveals good news and bad news. The good news? Unemployment declined further to 3.7%, annualized wage growth improved to 3.4% in the third quarter, and monthly net hiring averaged 190,000 in Q3. The bad news? Payrolls expanded with just 134,000 net new jobs last month, as underemployment ticked up 0.1% to 7.5% and year-over-year wage growth slowed to 2.8%. Some economists feel that Hurricane Florence significantly impacted the September data.3

 

SERVICE SECTOR EXPANDS AT A HISTORIC PACE

The Institute for Supply Management said its non-manufacturing purchasing manager index rose 3.1 points in September to 61.6. It has never been that high in its decade-long history. ISM’s PMI for the factory sector took a slight dip in September, slipping from 61.3 to 59.8 but still showing fast expansion.4

 

OIL MAKES ANOTHER WEEKLY ADVANCE

Crude is on a 4-week winning streak. At Friday’s closing bell, the price stood at $74.34 a barrel on the NYMEX, reflecting a 1.5% rise in five days. Again, worries over upcoming U.S. sanctions against Iran helped to send prices higher. WTI crude settled at $76.41 Wednesday, which approached a 4-year peak for the commodity.5

 

 

T I P   O F   T H E   W E E K
Yes, clipping coupons can save you money at the grocery store – but keep in mind, coupon deals may lead you to buy unneeded items. The cost of the extra purchases could cancel out any coupon savings.

 

 

THIS WEEK

While the U.S. bond market is closed Monday in observance of Columbus Day, U.S. stock exchanges are open for business; no major economic or earnings releases are scheduled. | Nothing major is slated for Tuesday, either. | Wednesday, investors consider the September Producer Price Index and earnings from Fastenal. | On Thursday, the September Consumer Price Index appears, along with the latest initial jobless claims report and earnings news from Delta Air Lines and Walgreens Boots Alliance. | The fall earnings season begins Friday, with announcements from Citigroup, JPMorgan Chase, PNC Financial Services Group, and Wells Fargo; in addition, the University of Michigan’s preliminary October consumer sentiment index arrives.

 

 

Q U O T E   O F   T H E   W E E K

Success is the maximum utilization of the ability that you have.”

Zig Ziglar

 

Sources: wsj.com, bigcharts.com, treasury.gov – 10/5/182,6,7,8

Indices are unmanaged, do not incur fees or expenses, and cannot be invested into directly. These returns do not include dividends. 10-year TIPS real yield = projected return at maturity given expected inflation.

 

 

T H E   W E E K L Y   R I D D L E

They can pass through state after state, all while never moving. What are they?

 

LAST WEEK’S RIDDLE: What can be broken, but should not be forgotten?

ANSWER: A promise.

 

 

Gregg A Hancock Jr.

Vice President SENB Wealth Management

Trust Business Development Officer

SENB Wealth Management

309-517-5122

wealthmanagement@senb.com

www.senb.com

 

Know someone who could use information like this?
Please feel free to send us their contact information via phone or email. (Don’t worry – we’ll request their permission before adding them to our mailing list.)

Please Note: Investment products provided by SENB Wealth Management are not FDIC insured, are not obligations of, deposits of, or guaranteed by any financial institution, involve Investment risk, Including the possible loss of principal amount invested, are not insured by any federal government agency.

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. The information herein has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. Investments will fluctuate and when redeemed may be worth more or less than when originally invested. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All market indices discussed are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment. Indices do not incur management fees, costs and expenses, and cannot be invested into directly. All economic and performance data is historical and not indicative of future results. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a price-weighted index of 30 actively traded blue-chip stocks. The NASDAQ Composite Index is a market-weighted index of all over-the-counter common stocks traded on the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System. The Standard & Poor’s 500 (S&P 500) is a market-cap weighted index composed of the common stocks of 500 leading companies in leading industries of the U.S. economy. NYSE Group, Inc. (NYSE:NYX) operates two securities exchanges: the New York Stock Exchange (the “NYSE”) and NYSE Arca (formerly known as the Archipelago Exchange, or ArcaEx®, and the Pacific Exchange). NYSE Group is a leading provider of securities listing, trading and market data products and services. The New York Mercantile Exchange, Inc. (NYMEX) is the world’s largest physical commodity futures exchange and the preeminent trading forum for energy and precious metals, with trading conducted through two divisions – the NYMEX Division, home to the energy, platinum, and palladium markets, and the COMEX Division, on which all other metals trade. Additional risks are associated with international investing, such as currency fluctuations, political and economic instability and differences in accounting standards. This material represents an assessment of the market environment at a specific point in time and is not intended to be a forecast of future events, or a guarantee of future results. MarketingPro, Inc. is not affiliated with any person or firm that may be providing this information to you. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional.

CITATIONS:

1 – thestreet.com/markets/stocks-rise-slightly-on-friday-after-september-jobs-report-14735092 [10/5/18]

2 – markets.wsj.com/us [10/5/18]

3 – bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-10-05/u-s-payrolls-and-wages-cool-while-jobless-rate-hits-48-year-low [10/5/18]

4 – instituteforsupplymanagement.org/ISMReport/NonMfgROB.cfm?navItemNumber=30177 [9/26/18]

5 – marketwatch.com/story/us-oil-benchmark-ends-nearly-flat-but-tallies-a-4th-straight-weekly-rise-2018-10-05 [10/5/18]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=10%2F5%2F17&x=0&y=0 [10/5/18]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=10%2F5%2F17&x=0&y=0 [10/5/18]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=10%2F5%2F17&x=0&y=0 [10/5/18]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=10%2F4%2F13&x=0&y=0 [10/5/18]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=10%2F4%2F13&x=0&y=0 [10/5/18]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=10%2F4%2F13&x=0&y=0 [10/5/18]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=10%2F6%2F08&x=0&y=0 [10/5/18]
6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=10%2F6%2F08&x=0&y=0 [10/5/18]
6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=10%2F6%2F08&x=0&y=0 [10/5/18]
7 – treasury.gov/resource-center/data-chart-center/interest-rates/Pages/TextView.aspx?data=realyield [10/5/18]
8 – treasury.gov/resource-center/data-chart-center/interest-rates/Pages/TextView.aspx?data=realyieldAll [10/5/18]  

 

Smart Financial & Insurance Moves for New Parents

As you start a family, consider these ideas.

Being a parent means being responsible to a degree you never have been before.

That elevated responsibility also impacts your financial decisions. You are now a provider and a protector, and that reality may make the following financial moves necessary.

Think about a budget.

As a couple, you may have lived for years without budgeting. As parents, this may change. You will face new recurring costs: clothes, toys, diapers, food. Keeping track of weekly or monthly expenses will be handy. (The Department of Agriculture has an online calculator where you can estimate the total cost of raising a child to adulthood. The math may surprise you: the U.S.D.A. puts the average cost at $233,610 for a middle-income family.)1,2

Take care of health and life insurance.

Your child should be added to your health insurance plan quickly. Most insurance providers require you to notify them of a child’s birth within 30 days. You can get started before then; be aware that a Social Security number and birth certificate can take weeks to arrive in the mail. If you are in a group health plan, talk with the human resources officer or benefits administrator at work, and let them know that you want to add a dependent to your health care plan. (If you have coverage through a private plan, your premiums may go up after you notify the carrier.) Under the Affordable Care Act, a parent or legal guardian who has health coverage arranged through the federal or state Marketplace has 60 days from the date of birth or adoption to enroll a child as a dependent on their plan; once that is done, health care coverage for the child will apply, retroactively.3

Term life insurance provides an affordable way for new parents to have some financial insulation against a worst-case scenario, and disability insurance (which may be available where you work) provides coverage in the event of an extended illness or injury that stops you from doing your job. If you have a Health Savings Account (HSA), you can contribute more per year when you have a child. The maximum annual contribution for a family is currently set at $6,850 (and for the record, the I.R.S. is allowing families to contribute up to $6,900 in 2018).4

Draft a will and review beneficiary designations.

A will can do more than declare who receives your assets when you die. It can also name a legal guardian for your child in the event both parents pass away. Additionally, you can specify a guardian of your estate in your will, to manage the assets left to a minor child. While you may have named your spouse or partner as the primary beneficiary of your IRA or investment account, you may decide to change that or at least add your child as a contingent beneficiary.5

See if you can save a little for college.

The estimated cost of four years at a public university starting in 2036? $184,000, CNBC reports. That may convince you to open a 529 plan or have some other kind of dedicated college savings account with investment options. Most 529 plans require a Social Security number for a beneficiary, so they are commonly started after a child is born, rather than before.2,6

Review your withholding status and tax forms.

An addition to your family means changes. You may also become eligible for some federal tax breaks, like the Earned Income Tax Credit, the Adoption Tax Credit, the Child Tax Credit, and the Child & Dependent Care Credit.7

Keep the big picture in mind.

You still need to build retirement savings; you still need to have an emergency fund. Becoming a family might make accomplishing those tasks harder, yet they remain just as important.

After reading all this, you may feel like you need to be a millionaire to raise a child. The fact is, most parents are not millionaires, and they manage. Whether you are wealthy or not, you will want to take care of many or all of these financial and insurance essentials before or after you bring your newborn home.

Gregg A Hancock Jr.

Vice President SENB Wealth Management

Trust Business Development Officer

SENB Wealth Management

309-517-5122

wealthmanagement@senb.com

www.senb.com

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Please Note: Investment products provided by SENB Wealth Management are not FDIC insured, are not obligations of, deposits of, or guaranteed by any financial institution, involve Investment risk, Including the possible loss of principal amount invested, are not insured by any federal government agency.

Citations.

1 – cnpp.usda.gov/tools/CRC_Calculator/default.aspx [9/20/18]

2 – tinyurl.com/y8rlmm7w [2/26/18]

3 – healthcare.com/info/health-insurance/baby-health-insurance-newborn [10/18/17]

4 – tinyurl.com/ya5g75ez [5/1/18]

5 – everplans.com/articles/what-does-a-guardian-of-the-estate-do [9/20/18]

6 – cnbc.com/2018/05/07/this-is-how-much-parents-need-to-save-to-cover-college-bills-in-2036.html [5/7/18]

7 – efile.com/tax-deductions-credits-for-parents-with-children-dependents/ [9/20/18]

 

Weekly Economic Update 10-1-18

FEDERAL RESERVE MAKES ITS THIRD RATE HIKE OF 2018

The central bank set the target range for the federal funds rate at 2.00-2.25% last week, in a move that economists and investors widely expected. One development was unexpected: the Fed removed the word “accommodative” from its latest policy statement, a hint that it may be on the verge of altering its monetary policy outlook. The Fed dot-plot still shows one more interest rate hike for 2018 and three hikes in 2019.1

 

HOUSEHOLDS SEE A VERY STRONG ECONOMY

Both marquee U.S. consumer confidence indices finished September in good shape. The Conference Board’s index reached an 18-year peak of 138.4, rising 3.7 points from its August mark. The University of Michigan’s gauge declined 0.7 points to a still-impressive reading of 100.1.2,3

 

A PERSONAL SPENDING MISS; A NEW HOME SALES GAIN

Looking at other economic indicators in a data-heavy week, consumer spending rose 0.3% in August, falling short of the 0.4% gain forecast by economists polled by Briefing.com. While reporting that advance, the Commerce Department also announced an improvement of 0.3% for personal incomes in August. The National Association of Realtors said that its pending home sales index declined 1.8% in the eighth month of the year; in better real estate news, the Census Bureau found new home buying up 3.5% in August, measuring a 12.7% yearly increase in the pace of new home sales.3,4

 

NASDAQ ADVANCES FOR THE WEEK, BUT S&P and DOW RETREAT

The S&P 500 finished the month at 2,913.98, losing 0.54% during a relatively calm week on Wall Street, which also saw the Dow Jones Industrial Average head 1.07% lower to 26,458.31. In contrast, the Nasdaq Composite gained 0.74% on the week to wrap up September at 8,046.35. Across the month, the S&P rose 0.43%, and the Dow, 1.90%, while the Nasdaq declined 0.78%. The small-cap Russell 2000 sank 2.62% in September, settling Friday at 1,695.10.5

 

 

T I P   O F   T H E   W E E K
When you inherit real estate, you immediately face some financial questions. Do you want to sell the property, rent it out, or keep it? What would each choice mean, tax-wise? Can you handle payments on an outstanding mortgage and maintenance costs? Talking to tax or real estate professionals is essential.

 

 

THIS WEEK

Monday, the Institute for Supply Management presents its September manufacturing PMI. | Paychex and PepsiCo announce earnings Tuesday morning; just before the closing bell, Fed chairman Jerome Powell delivers a speech on the U.S. inflation and employment outlook in Boston. | On Wednesday, ADP’s latest payrolls report appears along with the latest ISM service sector PMI and earnings from Lennar. | The September Challenger job-cut report and a new weekly initial jobless claims snapshot arrive Thursday, plus earnings from Constellation Brands and Costco. | The Department of Labor issues its September employment report on Friday.

 

 

Q U O T E   O F   T H E   W E E K

“A pound of pluck is worth a ton of luck.”

James Garfield

 

Sources: wsj.com, bigcharts.com, treasury.gov – 9/28/185,6,7,8

Indices are unmanaged, do not incur fees or expenses, and cannot be invested into directly. These returns do not include dividends. 10-year TIPS real yield = projected return at maturity given expected inflation.

 

 

T H E   W E E K L Y   R I D D L E

What can be broken, but should not be forgotten?

 

LAST WEEK’S RIDDLE: You go into the forest and get it, you sit down to find it, and then you go home, just wanting to get it out. What is it?

ANSWER: A splinter.

 

Gregg A Hancock Jr.

Vice President SENB Wealth Management

Trust Business Development Officer

SENB Wealth Management

309-517-5122

wealthmanagement@senb.com

www.senb.com

 

Know someone who could use information like this?
Please feel free to send us their contact information via phone or email. (Don’t worry – we’ll request their permission before adding them to our mailing list.)

Please Note: Investment products provided by SENB Wealth Management are not FDIC insured, are not obligations of, deposits of, or guaranteed by any financial institution, involve Investment risk, Including the possible loss of principal amount invested, are not insured by any federal government agency.

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. The information herein has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. Investments will fluctuate and when redeemed may be worth more or less than when originally invested. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All market indices discussed are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment. Indices do not incur management fees, costs and expenses, and cannot be invested into directly. All economic and performance data is historical and not indicative of future results. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a price-weighted index of 30 actively traded blue-chip stocks. The NASDAQ Composite Index is a market-weighted index of all over-the-counter common stocks traded on the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System. The Standard & Poor’s 500 (S&P 500) is a market-cap weighted index composed of the common stocks of 500 leading companies in leading industries of the U.S. economy. NYSE Group, Inc. (NYSE:NYX) operates two securities exchanges: the New York Stock Exchange (the “NYSE”) and NYSE Arca (formerly known as the Archipelago Exchange, or ArcaEx®, and the Pacific Exchange). NYSE Group is a leading provider of securities listing, trading and market data products and services. The New York Mercantile Exchange, Inc. (NYMEX) is the world’s largest physical commodity futures exchange and the preeminent trading forum for energy and precious metals, with trading conducted through two divisions – the NYMEX Division, home to the energy, platinum, and palladium markets, and the COMEX Division, on which all other metals trade. Additional risks are associated with international investing, such as currency fluctuations, political and economic instability and differences in accounting standards. This material represents an assessment of the market environment at a specific point in time and is not intended to be a forecast of future events, or a guarantee of future results. MarketingPro, Inc. is not affiliated with any person or firm that may be providing this information to you. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional.

CITATIONS:

1 – businessinsider.com/federal-reserve-fomc-statement-and-interest-rate-decision-september-2018-2018-9 [9/26/18]

2 – conference-board.org/data/consumerconfidence.cfm [9/25/18]

3 – briefing.com/investor/calendars/economic/2018/09/24-28 [9/28/18]

4 – cnbc.com/2018/09/26/august-new-home-sales.html [9/26/18]

5 – markets.wsj.com/us [9/28/18]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=9%2F28%2F17&x=0&y=0 [9/28/18]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=9%2F28%2F17&x=0&y=0 [9/28/18]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=9%2F28%2F17&x=0&y=0 [9/28/18]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=9%2F27%2F13&x=0&y=0 [9/28/18]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=9%2F27%2F13&x=0&y=0 [9/28/18]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=9%2F27%2F13&x=0&y=0 [9/28/18]

6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=9%2F29%2F08&x=0&y=0 [9/28/18]
6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=9%2F29%2F08&x=0&y=0 [9/28/18]
6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=9%2F29%2F08&x=0&y=0 [9/28/18]
7 – treasury.gov/resource-center/data-chart-center/interest-rates/Pages/TextView.aspx?data=realyield [9/28/18]
8 – treasury.gov/resource-center/data-chart-center/interest-rates/Pages/TextView.aspx?data=realyieldAll [9/28/18] 

Debunking a Few Popular Retirement Myths

It seems high time to dispel some of these misconceptions.

Generalizations about money and retirement linger. Some have been around for decades, and some new clichés have recently joined their ranks. Let’s examine a few.

 

“When I’m retired, I won’t really have to invest anymore.” Society still sees retirement as an end instead of a beginning – a finish line for a career. In reality, retirement is the start of a new and promising phase of life that could last a few decades. If you don’t keep one or two feet in the investment markets (most notably the equities markets), you risk quickly losing purchasing power as even moderate inflation will devalue the dollars you’ve saved. Keep saving, keep earning, and keep investing.

   

“My taxes will be lower when I retire.” Not necessarily. You may earn less, and that could put you in a lower tax bracket. On the other hand, you may end up waving goodbye to some of the tax breaks you enjoyed while working, and state and local taxes will almost certainly rise with time. In addition, you could pay taxes on money withdrawn from IRAs and other qualified retirement plans, perhaps even a portion of your Social Security benefits. While your earned income may decrease, you may end up losing a comparatively larger percentage of it to taxes after you retire.1  

  

“I started saving too late; I have no hope of retiring – I’ll have to work until I’m 85.” If your nest egg is less than six figures, working longer may be the best thing you can do. You will have X fewer years of retirement to plan for, which means you can keep earning a salary, and your savings can compound longer. Don’t lose hope: remember that you can make larger, catch-up contributions to IRAs after 50, and remember that you can really sock away some savings in workplace retirement plans. If you are 50 or older this year, you can put as much as $24,500 into a 401(k) plan. Some participants in 403(b) or 457(b) plans are also allowed that privilege. You can downsize and reduce debts and expenses to effectively give you more retirement money. You can also stay invested (see above).2

 

“Medicare will take care of me when I’m really old.” Not true. Medicare may (this is not guaranteed) pay for up to 100 days of long-term care expenses you incur. If you need months or years of long-term care, you will pay for it out of pocket if you lack long-term care insurance. According to Genworth Financial’s Cost of Care Survey, the average yearly cost of a semi-private room in a nursing home is $235 a day ($85,775 per year).3,4

   

“I should help my kids with college costs before I retire.” That’s a nice thought, but you don’t have to follow through on it. Remember, there is no retiree “financial aid.” Your student can work, save, or borrow to pay for the cost of college, with decades ahead to pay back any loans. You can’t go to the bank and get a “retirement loan.” Moreover, if you outlive your money your kids may end up taking you in and you will be a financial burden to them. Putting your financial needs above theirs is fair and smart as you approach retirement.

  

“I’ll live on less when I’m retired.” We all have the cliché in our minds of a retired couple in their seventies or eighties living modestly, hardly eating out, and asking about senior discounts. In the later phase of retirement, couples often choose to live on less, sometimes out of necessity. The initial phase of retirement may be a different story. For many, the first few years of retirement mean traveling, new adventures, and “living it up” a little – all of which may mean new retirees may actually “live on more” out of the retirement gate.

 

“No one really retires anymore.” Well, it is true than many baby boomers will probably keep working to some degree. Some people love to work and want to work as long as they can. What if you can’t, though? What if your employer shocks you and suddenly lets you go? What if your health won’t let you work 40 hours or even 10 hours a week? You could retire more abruptly than you believe you will. This is why even workaholics need a solid retirement plan.

 

There is no “generic” retirement experience, and therefore, there is no one-size-fits-all retirement plan. Each individual, couple, or family needs a strategy tailored to their particular money situation and life and financial objectives.

 

Gregg A Hancock Jr.

Vice President SENB Wealth Management

Trust Business Development Officer

SENB Wealth Management

309-517-5122

wealthmanagement@senb.com

www.senb.com

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Please Note: Investment products provided by SENB Wealth Management are not FDIC insured, are not obligations of, deposits of, or guaranteed by any financial institution, involve Investment risk, Including the possible loss of principal amount invested, are not insured by any federal government agency.

Citations.

1 – money.usnews.com/money/retirement/iras/articles/2017-04-03/5-new-taxes-to-watch-out-for-in-retirement [4/3/18]

2 – fool.com/retirement/2017/10/29/what-are-the-maximum-401k-contribution-limits-for.aspx [3/6/18]

3 – medicare.gov/coverage/skilled-nursing-facility-care.html [9/13/18]

4 – fool.com/retirement/2018/05/24/the-1-retirement-expense-were-still-not-preparing.aspx [5/24/18]

 

Is Your Company’s 401(k) Plan as Good as It Could Be?

Two recent court rulings may make you want to double-check.

 

How often do retirement plan sponsors check up on 401(k)s? Not as often as they should, perhaps. Employers need to be especially vigilant these days.

 

Every plan sponsor should know about two recent court rulings. One came from the Supreme Court in 2015; another, from the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California in 2017. Both concerned the same case: Tibble v. Edison International.

 

In Tibble v. Edison International, some beneficiaries of the Edison 401(k) Savings Plan took Edison International to court, seeking damages for losses and equitable relief. The plaintiffs contended that Edison International’s financial advisors and investment committee had breached their fiduciary duty to the plan participants. Twice, they argued, the plan sponsor had added higher-priced funds to the plan’s investment selection when near-identical, lower-priced equivalents were available.1

 

Siding with the plan participants, the SCOTUS ruled that under ERISA, a plaintiff may initiate a claim for violation of fiduciary duty by a plan sponsor within six years of the breach of an ongoing duty of prudence in investment selection.1

 

The unanimous SCOTUS decision on Tibble (expressed by Justice Stephen Breyer) stated that “cost-conscious management is fundamental to prudence in the investment function.” This degree of alertness should be applied “not only in making investments but in monitoring and reviewing investments. Implicit in a trustee’s [plan fiduciary’s] duties is a duty to be cost-conscious.”2,3

 

Two years later, the U.S. District Court ruled that Edison International had indeed committed a breach of fiduciary duty regarding the selection of all 17 mutual funds offered to participants in its retirement plan. It also stated that damages would be calculated “from 2011 to the present, based not on the statutory rate, but by the 401(k) plan’s overall returns” during those six years.3

 

The message from these rulings is clear: the investment committee created by a plan sponsor shoulders nearly as much responsibility for monitoring investments and fees as a third-party advisor. Most small businesses, however, are not prepared to benchmark processes and continuously look for and reject unacceptable investments.

 

Do you have high-quality investment choices in your plan? While larger plan sponsors have more “pull” with plan providers, this does not relegate a small company sponsoring a 401(k) to a substandard investment selection. Employees are smart and will ask questions sooner or later. “Why does this 401(k) have only one bond fund?” “Where are the target-date funds?” “I went to Morningstar, and some of these funds have so-so ratings.” Questions and comments like these are reasonable and surface when a plan’s roster of investments is too short.

 

Are your plan’s investment fees reasonable? Employees can deduce this without checking up on the Form 5500 you file – there are websites that offer some general information as to what is and what is not acceptable. Most retirement savers read up on this with time, and most know (or will know) that a plan with administrative fees pushing 1% is less than ideal.

 

Are you using institutional share classes in your 401(k)? This was the key issue brought to light by the plan participants in Tibble v. Edison International. The U.S. District Court noted that while Edison International’s investment committee and third-party advisors placed 17 funds in its retirement plan, it “selected the retail shares instead of the institutional shares or failed to switch to institutional share classes once one became available.”3

 

Institutional share classes commonly have lower fees than retail share classes. To some observers, the difference in fees may seem trivial – but the impact on retirement savings over time may be significant.3

 

When was the last time you reviewed your 401(k)-fund selection & share class? Was it a few years ago? Has it been longer than that? Why not review this today? Call in a financial professional to help you review your plan’s investment offering and investment fees.

  

Gregg A Hancock Jr.

Vice President SENB Wealth Management

Trust Business Development Officer

SENB Wealth Management

309-517-5122

wealthmanagement@senb.com

www.senb.com

 

Please Note: Investment products provided by SENB Wealth Management are not FDIC insured, are not obligations of, deposits of, or guaranteed by any financial institution, involve Investment risk, Including the possible loss of principal amount invested, are not insured by any federal government agency.

 

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

   

Citations.

1 – faegrebd.com/en/insights/publications/2015/5/supreme-court-decides-tibble-v-edison-international [5/18/15]

2 – cpajournal.com/2017/09/13/erisas-reasonable-fee-requirement/ [9/13/17]

3 – tinyurl.com/yd8s2rq3 [8/17/17]

 

 

The IRA and the 401(k)

Comparing their features, merits, and demerits.

  

How do you save for retirement? Two options probably come to mind right away: the IRA and the 401(k). Both offer you relatively easy ways to build a retirement fund. Here is a look at the features, merits, and demerits of each account, starting with what they have in common.

 

Taxes are deferred on money held within IRAs and 401(k)s. That opens the door for tax-free compounding of those invested dollars – a major plus for any retirement saver.1

 

IRAs and 401(k)s also offer you another big tax break. It varies depending on whether the account is traditional or Roth in nature. When you have a traditional IRA or 401(k), your account contributions are tax deductible, but when you eventually withdraw the money for retirement, it will be taxed as regular income. When you have a Roth IRA or 401(k), your account contributions are not tax deductible, but if you follow Internal Revenue Service rules, your withdrawals from the account in retirement are tax free.1

 

Generally, the I.R.S. penalizes withdrawals from these accounts before age 59½. Distributions from traditional IRAs and 401(k)s prior to that age usually trigger a 10% federal tax penalty, on top of income tax on the withdrawn amount. Roth IRAs and Roth 401(k)s allow you to withdraw a sum equivalent to your account contributions at any time without taxes or penalties, but early distributions of the account earnings are taxable and may also be hit with the 10% early withdrawal penalty.1

 

You must make annual withdrawals from 401(k)s and traditional IRAs after age 70½. Annual withdrawals from a Roth IRA are not required during the owner’s lifetime, only after his or her death. Even Roth 401(k)s require annual withdrawals after age 70½.2

 

 

Now, on to the major differences.

  

Annual contribution limits for IRAs and 401(k)s differ greatly. You may direct up to $18,500 into a 401(k) in 2018; $24,500, if you are 50 or older. In contrast, the maximum 2018 IRA contribution is $5,500; $6,500, if you are 50 or older.1

 

Your employer may provide you with matching 401(k) contributions. This is free money coming your way. The match is usually partial, but certainly nothing to disregard – it might be a portion of the dollars you contribute up to 6% of your annual salary, for example. Do these employer contributions count toward your personal yearly 401(k) contribution limit? No, they do not. Contribute enough to get the match if your company offers you one.1

 

An IRA permits a wide variety of investments, in contrast to a 401(k). The typical 401(k) offers only about 20 investment options, and you have no control over what investments are chosen. With an IRA, you have a vast range of potential investment choices.1,3

 

You can contribute to a 401(k) no matter how much you earn. Your income may limit your eligibility to contribute to a Roth IRA; at certain income levels, you may be prohibited from contributing the full amount, or any amount.1

 

If you leave your job, you cannot take your 401(k) with you. It stays in the hands of the retirement plan administrator that your employer has selected. The money remains invested, but you may have less control over it than you once did. You do have choices: you can withdraw the money from the old 401(k), which will likely result in a tax penalty; you can leave it where it is; you can possibly transfer it to a 401(k) at your new job; or, you can roll it over into an IRA.4,5

 

You cannot control 401(k) fees. Some 401(k)s have high annual account and administrative fees that effectively eat into their annual investment returns. The plan administrator sets such costs. The annual fees on your IRA may not nearly be so expensive.1

 

All this said, contributing to an IRA or a 401(k) is an excellent idea. In fact, many pre-retirees contribute to both 401(k)s and IRAs at once. Today, investing in these accounts seems all but necessary to pursue retirement savings and income goals.

 

Gregg A Hancock Jr.

Vice President SENB Wealth Management

Trust Business Development Officer

SENB Wealth Management

309-517-5122

wealthmanagement@senb.com

www.senb.com

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Please Note: Investment products provided by SENB Wealth Management are not FDIC insured, are not obligations of, deposits of, or guaranteed by any financial institution, involve Investment risk, Including the possible loss of principal amount invested, are not insured by any federal government agency.

   

Citations.

1 – nerdwallet.com/article/ira-vs-401k-retirement-accounts [4/30/18]

2 – irs.gov/retirement-plans/retirement-plans-faqs-regarding-required-minimum-distributions [5/30/18]

3 – tinyurl.com/y77cjtfz [10/31/17]

4 – finance.zacks.com/tax-penalty-moving-401k-ira-3585.html [9/6/18]

5 – cnbc.com/2018/04/26/what-to-do-with-your-401k-when-you-change-jobs.html [4/26/18]

 

Weekly Economic Update 9-17-18

In this week’s recap: consumer optimism increases, the retail sales pace slows, inflation pressure weakens, and Wall Street sees wide-ranging gains.

CONSUMER SENTIMENT EXCEEDS EXPECTATIONS

In its initial September edition, the University of Michigan’s monthly consumer sentiment index rose 4.6 points to 100.8, a 6-month high. Economists polled by Bloomberg had forecast a reading of 96.6. Fifty-six percent of households responding to the survey said that they had made recent financial gains; the all-time high for the survey is 57%, recorded in both March 2018 and February 1998. The index’s future expectations gauge reached a 14-year peak of 91.1.1

 

RETAIL SALES ALMOST FLAT IN AUGUST

The 0.1% August advance was the smallest monthly gain since February. Core retail purchases (which exclude the automotive, food, and home improvement categories) rose by the same amount. The Department of Commerce did revise the July numbers upward: the overall retail sales increase in that month went to 0.7%; the core retail sales gain, to 0.8%.2

 

ANNUALIZED INFLATION DECREASES

August’s Consumer Price Index shows 12-month inflation at 2.7%, down from 2.9%. Yearly core inflation retreated similarly, lessening from 2.4% to 2.2% last month. The headline CPI rose 0.2% in August; the core CPI, 0.1%. Both the headline and core Producer Price Index declined 0.1% in August, significantly reducing their annualized gains. Twelve-month wholesale inflation shrank 0.5% to 2.8%, while yearly core wholesale inflation retreated to 2.3% from 2.7%.3

 

A POSITIVE FIVE DAYS FOR EQUITIES

All three major stock indices advanced last week. The Dow Industrials gained 0.92% to reach 26,154.67 at Friday’s close. Settling at 8,010.04 Friday, the Nasdaq Composite was up 1.36% for the week. The S&P 500 improved 1.16% to 2,904.98. The main barometer of Wall Street volatility, the CBOE VIX, fell 18.88% for the week to 12.07.4

 

 

T I P   O F   T H E   W E E K
If you recently received a promotion or raise, you need not spend more money simply because you have it. Counter the temptation to buy this or that with the question “Do I really need this?” Living within your means could leave you with more money to save and invest for the future.

 

 

THIS WEEK

FedEx announces earnings Monday. | AutoZone, Cracker Barrel, and General Mills present earnings Tuesday. | On Wednesday, the Census Bureau provides a snapshot of August residential construction activity, and Red Hat reports quarterly results. | Investors consider August existing home sales numbers, a new initial jobless claims report, and earnings from Darden Restaurants, Micron Technology, Steelcase, and Thor Industries on Thursday. | Nothing major is slated for Friday.

 

 

Q U O T E   O F   T H E   W E E K

“The greatest pleasure in life is doing what people say you cannot do.”

Walter Bagehot

Sources: wsj.com, bigcharts.com, treasury.gov – 9/14/184,5,6,7

Indices are unmanaged, do not incur fees or expenses, and cannot be invested into directly. These returns do not include dividends. 10-year TIPS real yield = projected return at maturity given expected inflation.

 

 

T H E   W E E K L Y   R I D D L E

It takes a crew of eight workers four hours to dig a 30’ hole in the ground. How long would it take them to dig half a hole?

 

LAST WEEK’S RIDDLE: What is long and narrow, yet can look far and wide?

ANSWER: A telescope.

 

Gregg A Hancock Jr.

Vice President SENB Wealth Management

Trust Business Development Officer

SENB Wealth Management

309-517-5122

wealthmanagement@senb.com

www.senb.com

 

Know someone who could use information like this?
Please feel free to send us their contact information via phone or email. (Don’t worry – we’ll request their permission before adding them to our mailing list.)

Please Note: Investment products provided by SENB Wealth Management are not FDIC insured, are not obligations of, deposits of, or guaranteed by any financial institution, involve Investment risk, Including the possible loss of principal amount invested, are not insured by any federal government agency.

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. The information herein has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. Investments will fluctuate and when redeemed may be worth more or less than when originally invested. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All market indices discussed are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment. Indices do not incur management fees, costs and expenses, and cannot be invested into directly. All economic and performance data is historical and not indicative of future results. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a price-weighted index of 30 actively traded blue-chip stocks. The NASDAQ Composite Index is a market-weighted index of all over-the-counter common stocks traded on the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System. The Standard & Poor’s 500 (S&P 500) is a market-cap weighted index composed of the common stocks of 500 leading companies in leading industries of the U.S. economy. NYSE Group, Inc. (NYSE:NYX) operates two securities exchanges: the New York Stock Exchange (the “NYSE”) and NYSE Arca (formerly known as the Archipelago Exchange, or ArcaEx®, and the Pacific Exchange). NYSE Group is a leading provider of securities listing, trading and market data products and services. The New York Mercantile Exchange, Inc. (NYMEX) is the world’s largest physical commodity futures exchange and the preeminent trading forum for energy and precious metals, with trading conducted through two divisions – the NYMEX Division, home to the energy, platinum, and palladium markets, and the COMEX Division, on which all other metals trade. Additional risks are associated with international investing, such as currency fluctuations, political and economic instability and differences in accounting standards. This material represents an assessment of the market environment at a specific point in time and is not intended to be a forecast of future events, or a guarantee of future results. MarketingPro, Inc. is not affiliated with any person or firm that may be providing this information to you. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional.

CITATIONS:

1 – bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-09-14/u-s-consumer-sentiment-rises-to-six-month-high-above-estimate [9/14/18]

2 – cnbc.com/2018/09/14/us-retail-sales-august-2018.html [9/14/18]

3 – investing.com/economic-calendar/ [9/14/18]

4 – markets.wsj.com/us [9/14/18]

5 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=9%2F14%2F17&x=0&y=0 [9/14/18]

5 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=9%2F14%2F17&x=0&y=0 [9/14/18]

5 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=9%2F14%2F17&x=0&y=0 [9/14/18]

5 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=9%2F13%2F13&x=0&y=0 [9/14/18]

5 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=9%2F13%2F13&x=0&y=0 [9/14/18]

5 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=9%2F13%2F13&x=0&y=0 [9/14/18]

5 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=9%2F15%2F08&x=0&y=0 [9/14/18]
5 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=9%2F15%2F08&x=0&y=0 [9/14/18]
5 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=9%2F15%2F08&x=0&y=0 [9/14/18]
6 – treasury.gov/resource-center/data-chart-center/interest-rates/Pages/TextView.aspx?data=realyield [9/14/18]
7 – treasury.gov/resource-center/data-chart-center/interest-rates/Pages/TextView.aspx?data=realyieldAll [9/14/18]  

 

Weekly Economic Update 9-10-18

In this week’s recap: wage growth picks up, the factory and service sectors hum with activity, oil retreats, and new tariffs could be imposed on China.

 

LATEST JOBS REPORT CONFIRMS WAGE GROWTH IS ACCELERATING

According to the Department of Labor’s newest employment report, average pay for U.S. private sector workers improved 2.9% in the 12 months ending in August. That is the best annualized wage boost since the end of the Great Recession in 2009 and an improvement from 2.7% in July. The economy added 201,000 net new jobs last month. The headline jobless rate remained at 3.9%; the U-6 rate, which includes both unemployed and underemployed Americans, declined 0.1% to 7.4%, a 17-year low.1

 

STRONG AUGUST SHOWINGS FOR THE ISM INDICES

Both purchasing manager indices maintained by the Arizona-based Institute for Supply Management rebounded last month. ISM’s PMI tracking the U.S. service sector rose 2.8 points to 58.5, and its factory sector PMI climbed to an impressive 61.3 from the previous mark of 58.1.2

 

OIL TAKES A WEEKLY LOSS

Retreating 2.9% in four trading days, West Texas Intermediate crude ended the week at $67.75 on the NYMEX. Light sweet crude had its first down week since August, and its Friday closing value was its lowest since August 21. The big concern: the potential impact of tariffs on global oil demand.3

 

STOCKS DECLINE; POSSIBLE NEW TARIFFS ON CHINA ANNOUNCED

Friday, President Trump told reporters that he was willing to authorize import taxes on another $267 billion of Chinese goods entering the U.S.; this would effectively put an across-the-board tax on Chinese imports in place. This development and a broad tech selloff impacted Wall Street during a shortened trading week. In trading Tuesday through Friday, the S&P 500 fell 1.02%, to 2,871.68; the Dow Jones Industrial Average 0.27%, to 25,916.54; the Nasdaq Composite 2.30%, to 7,902.54.4,5,6

 

 

T I P   O F   T H E   W E E K
If you plan to age in place, think about the future upkeep of your home. Could the cost of maintenance and “senior upgrades” to enhance safety and accessibility prove too much to handle financially? Or does it appear to be manageable?

 

 

THIS WEEK

Hovnanian Enterprises and Sonos present earnings on Monday. | Tuesday, nothing major is scheduled. | On Wednesday, Apple holds its iPhone XS launch event, and the August Producer Price Index and a new Federal Reserve Beige Book appear. | Thursday, investors pay attention to the August Consumer Price Index and quarterly results from Kroger. | On Friday, Wall Street considers August retail sales figures and the preliminary September consumer sentiment index from the University of Michigan.

 

 

Q U O T E   O F   T H E   W E E K

“Part of being a hero is knowing when you don’t need to be one anymore.”

Alan Moore

Sources: wsj.com, bigcharts.com, treasury.gov – 9/7/186,7,8,9

Indices are unmanaged, do not incur fees or expenses, and cannot be invested into directly. These returns do not include dividends.

10-year TIPS real yield = projected return at maturity given expected inflation.

 

 

T H E   W E E K L Y   R I D D L E

What is long and narrow, yet can look far and wide?

 

LAST WEEK’S RIDDLE: It can hurt and make people bleed, but in another environment, its smaller version can also be instrumental in making them well. What is it?

ANSWER: A knife.

 

Gregg A Hancock Jr.

Vice President SENB Wealth Management

Trust Business Development Officer

SENB Wealth Management

309-517-5122

wealthmanagement@senb.com

www.senb.com

Know someone who could use information like this?
Please feel free to send us their contact information via phone or email. (Don’t worry – we’ll request their permission before adding them to our mailing list.)

Please Note: Investment products provided by SENB Wealth Management are not FDIC insured, are not obligations of, deposits of, or guaranteed by any financial institution, involve Investment risk, Including the possible loss of principal amount invested, are not insured by any federal government agency.

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. The information herein has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. Investments will fluctuate and when redeemed may be worth more or less than when originally invested. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All market indices discussed are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment. Indices do not incur management fees, costs and expenses, and cannot be invested into directly. All economic and performance data is historical and not indicative of future results. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a price-weighted index of 30 actively traded blue-chip stocks. The NASDAQ Composite Index is a market-weighted index of all over-the-counter common stocks traded on the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System. The Standard & Poor’s 500 (S&P 500) is a market-cap weighted index composed of the common stocks of 500 leading companies in leading industries of the U.S. economy. NYSE Group, Inc. (NYSE:NYX) operates two securities exchanges: the New York Stock Exchange (the “NYSE”) and NYSE Arca (formerly known as the Archipelago Exchange, or ArcaEx®, and the Pacific Exchange). NYSE Group is a leading provider of securities listing, trading and market data products and services. The New York Mercantile Exchange, Inc. (NYMEX) is the world’s largest physical commodity futures exchange and the preeminent trading forum for energy and precious metals, with trading conducted through two divisions – the NYMEX Division, home to the energy, platinum, and palladium markets, and the COMEX Division, on which all other metals trade. Additional risks are associated with international investing, such as currency fluctuations, political and economic instability and differences in accounting standards. This material represents an assessment of the market environment at a specific point in time and is not intended to be a forecast of future events, or a guarantee of future results. MarketingPro, Inc. is not affiliated with any person or firm that may be providing this information to you. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional.

CITATIONS:

1 – bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-09-07/u-s-payrolls-rise-201-000-while-wage-gains-accelerate-to-2-9 [9/7/18]

2 – instituteforsupplymanagement.org/ISMReport/NonMfgROB.cfm?SSO=1 [9/6/18]

3 – marketwatch.com/story/oil-price-stabilizes-after-retreat-on-rising-product-inventories-2018-09-07 [9/7/18]

4 – nytimes.com/2018/09/07/business/trump-china-trade-war-tariffs.html [9/7/18]

5 – forexlive.com/technical-analysis/!/us-stocks-end-lower-nasdaq-worst-week-since-march-23rd-20180907 [9/7/18]

6 – markets.wsj.com/us [9/7/18]
7 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=9%2F7%2F17&x=0&y=0 [9/7/18]
7 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=9%2F7%2F17&x=0&y=0 [9/7/18]

7 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=9%2F7%2F17&x=0&y=0 [9/7/18]
7 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=9%2F6%2F13&x=0&y=0 [9/7/18]
7 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=9%2F6%2F13&x=0&y=0 [9/7/18]

7 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=9%2F6%2F13&x=0&y=0 [9/7/18]

7 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=9%2F8%2F08&x=0&y=0 [9/7/18]
7 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=9%2F8%2F08&x=0&y=0 [9/7/18]

7 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=9%2F8%2F08&x=0&y=0 [9/7/18]
8 – treasury.gov/resource-center/data-chart-center/interest-rates/Pages/TextView.aspx?data=realyield [9/7/18]
9 – treasury.gov/resource-center/data-chart-center/interest-rates/Pages/TextView.aspx?data=realyieldAll [9/7/18]  

 

Daniel P. Daly, President and CEO of SENB Bank, thanks you, Quad Cities!

Daniel P. Daly, President and CEO of SENB Bank wishes to thank everyone in the Quad Cities for voting for SENB Bank as the Reader’s Choice Winner for “Best Bank”